Birmingham Public Library
2100 Park Place
Birmingham, Alabama 35203
http://www.bplonline.org
Genealogy
Native Americans / The Five Civilized Tribes
  1. Adair, James. Adair's History of the American Indians. Samuel Cole Williams, ed. Johnson City, TN: The Watauga Press, 1930.

    E77.A22
    Adairs work is the authority on Southern Indians east of the Mississippi River.

  2. Applications from the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Muskogee Area Office, Relating to Enrollment in the Five Civilized Tribes under the Act of 1896. 54 reels. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1992.

    E78 .I5 A66 1992 microfilm
    The applications for enrollment of Cherokees, Chickasaws, Choctaws, and Creeks, as well as those of former slaves (freedmen) of the Chickasaw and Choctaw tribes. Seminole applications are not included as none were found. Applicants include Indians by blood, spouses of Indians, and freedmen. Roll 1 is an index to the series.

  3. Carter, Kent. The Dawes Commission and the Allotment of the Five Civilized Tribes, 1893-1914. Orem, UT: Ancestry, 1999.

    E78 .I5 C37 1999
    A well researched compilation on the Dawes Commission. Good bibliography with two appendices, one that is a list of the Tribal Rolls.

  4. Cherokee and Creek Indians. Ethnographic Report on Royce Area 79: Chickasaw, Cherokee, Creek, by Charles H. Fairbanks; Cherokee Treaties, John H. Goff; Commission Findings, Indian Claims Commission. NY: Garland Publishing Inc., 1974.

    E99.C5 C38
    This text contains maps, the land cessions made by the Indians and names of many Indians. There is no index.

  5. Cotterill, R.S. The Southern Indians: The Story of the Civilized Tribes before Removal. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 1954.

    E78.S55 C6
    Cotterills book is a fine source for information on the Cherokee, Choctaw, Creek, and Chickasaw Indians before 1830.

  6. Enrollment Cards of the Five Civilized Tribes, 1896-1914. Reels 1, 67-93. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1980.

    E78.I5 E67 1980 microfilm
    The first reel is an index to the final rolls, which provide the roll number for each person. No indexes have been located for the majority of the "D" and "R" cards. The information given on each applicant includes name, roll number, age, gender, degree of Indian blood, relationship to the head of the family, parents' names, and references to enrollment on earlier rolls used by the Commission for verification of eligibility.

  7. Foreman, Grant. The Five Civilized Tribes: Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, Seminole. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 1934.

    E78.O45 F6
    Foremans book is a basic research tool. He provides the history of the forced migration of the tribes from Alabama, Georgia, Florida and Mississippi.

  8. Indian Removal: The Emigration of the Five Civilized Tribes of Indians. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 1953.

    E78.I5 F8 1953
    This book continues the story of Indian removal that took place over a decade.

  9. Harris, Kenneth E. and Steven D. Tilley. Index, Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774-1789. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1976.

    GS 4.2 C 76/2 1774/89 Gov Doc
    A comprehensive index that covers the Papers of the Continental Congress. There are numerous entries to the Five Civilized Tribes, other tribes and Indian agents.

  10. Hill, Edward E. Guide to Records in the National Archives of the United States Relating to American Indians. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1982.

    Z1209.U5 H54 1982
    Hill provides a brief description of the records and the agency responsible for their creation.

  11. Hudson, Charles. The Southeastern Indians. Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 1976.

    E78.S65 H82
    Hudsons text gives full coverage of Southeastern Indians from prehistory to removal. There are seven kinship diagrams for Creek Indians, maps, illustrations and endnotes.

  12. Johnson, Steven L. Guide to American Indian Documents in the Congressional Serial Set: 1817-1899. NY: Clearwater Publishing Company, 1977.

    KF8201.A1 J63 1977
    This text covers only documents and reports which have been published in the Congressional Serial Set from the 15th through the 55th Congresses, 1 December 1817 to 3 March 1899. The index is organized primarily by tribal headings. The main text is in chronological order with a subject index to the book.

  13. Kirkham, E. Kay. Our Native Americans and Their Records of Genealogical Value. 2 vols. Logan, UT: The Everton Publishers, Inc., 1980-84.

    Z1209.2.N67 K57
    Volume one discusses basic Indian genealogical sources while volume two is a comprehensive aid for researchers hunting their Indian ancestors.

  14. Royce, Charles C. Indian Land Cessions in the United States. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1900; reprint, New York: Arno Press Inc., 1971.

    E93.R885 1971
    Royce provides descriptions of the cessions, date of the cession, tribe, historical data, maps, and location of the cession. Essential tool for research.

  15. Swanton, John R. The Indian Tribes of North America. Smithsonian Institution Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 145. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1946; reprint, Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1974.

    E77.S94
    A definitive encyclopedic work on American Indians organized by state, with details on each tribe and an excellent index.

  16. U. S. Congress. American State Papers. Documents, Legislative and Executives, of The Congress of the United States. Land Series. 9 vols. Washington, DC: Gales and Seaton, 1832-1861; reprint, 10 vols., vol. 10 Grassroots of America: Index to American State Papers. Greenville, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1994.

    J33.A4 1994
    There are eight volumes of the American State Papers. Land Series. This is a source frequently overlooked by persons searching for their Native American ancestors. Only a fraction of the possible claims by Indians are available. In vol. 4, pp. 858-860 a group of Creek Nation "half breeds" claim land in Alabama. There was a claim by some Cherokee under the Act of Congress, 17 February 1819. The Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek in 1830 with the Choctaw is the most notable and extensive land settlement with a tribe.

  17. U. S. Dept. of the Interior. Library. Biographical and Historical Index of American Indians and Persons Involved in Indian Affairs. 8 vols. Boston: G.K. Hall & Co., 1966.

    Z1209.U494
    Extensive listings of Indian agents, Indian chiefs, historically prominent Indians and obscure information relating to tribal matters. Arranged alphabetically by subject.

  18. U. S. Subsistence Dept. The Indian Removals. 23d Cong., 1st sess., S. Doc. 512, title: Correspondence on the Subject of the Emigration of Indians, Between the 30th November 1831, and 27th December, 1833. Washington, DC: D. Green, 1833; reprint, 5 vols. NY: AMS Press, 1974.

    E93.U979 1974
    These volumes contain source documents related to Indian removal. Between 1820-1840 about 100,000 Indians were removed from their homes and escorted by the United States Army west of the Mississippi River to what is now Oklahoma. The largest number removed were of the Five Civilized Tribes of the South. There is a census of the Creek Nation ?n volume 4. There is no surname index to the set.

Back to Top

Native Americans -- Cherokee
  1. Adair, James. Cherokee Emigration Rolls, 1817-1835. Oklahoma City, OK: Baker Publishing Company, 1977.

    E99.C5 B27
    Lists 1,600 heads of Indian families who emigrated from Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, and North Carolina. These rolls do not include the 1835 Cherokee census. No emigration list was kept of those who emigrated prior to 1817.

  2. Blankenship, Bob. 1924 Baker Roll: Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina. Cherokee, NC: The author, 1998.

    E99.C5 B53 1998
    The final roll of the eastern Cherokee Indians of North Carolina as prepared by Fred A. Baker. Blankenship has included in his book the 1924 Congressional Act providing for the final disposition of the affairs of the Eastern Band of Cherokee.

  3. Cherokee Roots. vol. 1, 2d ed., vol. 2, 3d ed. Cherokee, NC: The author, 1992.

    E99.C5 B53
    These volumes contain the names of the Cherokee living east and west of the Mississippi River, the Old Settler Rolls, Miller Rolls, Dawes Roll and Drennen Roll.

  4. Dawes Roll "Plus" of Cherokee Nation, 1898. Cherokee, NC: The author, 1994.

    E99.C5 D38 1994
    The 1898 Dawes Roll plus the Miller Roll information for those that were on both rolls. A search can be made from 1898 to 1906 and see such items as a 1906 surname change brought about by marriage, divorce or adoption, also ages, addresses, relationships, Miller application number and all 36,714 Cherokee Nation citizens are included.

  5. Guion Miller Roll "Plus" of Eastern Cherokee, East and West of Mississippi, 1909. Cherokee, NC: The author, 1994.

    E99.C5 G84 1994
    The 1909 Guion Miller roll plus the 1898 Dawes roll information for those that were on both rolls. Includes all applicants for the Miller Roll, both accepted and not accepted for the Court of Claims settlement. A search can be made back from 1906 to the 1898 Dawes Roll and find items of information such as the Dawes Roll number, census card number, degree of Cherokee blood and surname in 1898.

  6. Bogle, Dixie. Cherokee Nation Births and Deaths, 1884-1901. Owensboro, KY: Cook & McDowell Publications, 1980.

    E99.C5 B58
    Names abstracted from the newspapers Indian Chieftain and Daily Chieftain.

  7. Cherokee Nation Marriages, 1884-1901. Owensboro, KY: Cook & McDowell Publications, 1980.

    E99.C5 B62
    This is an alphabetical surname list of names abstracted from the newspapers Indian Chieftain and Daily Chieftain.

  8. Chase, Maybelle W. Cherokee Drennen Roll of 1851. Tulsa, OK: The author, 1994.

    E99.C5 C373 1994
    The Drennen Roll is a roll of emigrant Cherokees taken in 1851 with the per capita payment being made in 1851 at Ft. Gibson.

  9. Crumpton, Barbara. 1851 Chapman Roll of the Eastern Cherokee. Duncan, OK: The author, 1986.

    E99.C5 C78
    Enumerates the Eastern Cherokee attached to the Qualla Reservation in North Carolina and their family groups.

  10. 1884 Hester Roll of the Eastern Cherokee. Duncan, OK: Creative Copies, 1956.

    E99.C5 C7
    It appears that Mr. Hester began his enrollment in Swain Co., NC and extended his lists into Alabama, California, Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, New Jersey, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia.

  11. Edgington, Billy Dubois and Carol Anne Buswell. Vital Information from the Guion Miller Roll (Eastern Cherokee Court of Claims) 1906-1909. Mill Creek, WA: Indian Scout Publications, 1998.

    E99.C5 E35 1998
    Between 27 August 1906 and 18 May 1909, 45,940 applications were completed by Guion Miller. Each qualifying applicant received a warrant worth $133.18. In order to fulfill the major requirement for admission, (showing ancestral connection to someone who had signed the 1835 Treaty of New Echota) extensive genealogical information was required. At least two generations of family information was included and some have more generations on their applications. There were no geographic limitations imposed on the applicants, as there had been in the Dawes Commission enrollment. Non-reservation Cherokee could apply.

  12. Felldin, Jeanne Robey and Charlotte Magee Tucker. Index to the 1835 Census of the Cherokee Indians East of the Mississippi River. Tomball, TX: Genealogical Publications, 1978.

    E99.C5 F4
    Felldin has compiled an index to the 1835 Henderson Roll. This Roll was a count of the Cherokee East of the Mississippi River in 1835. The Roll lists a "head of family", males under and over 18 years of age, females under and over 16 years of age, slaves were listed as male and female as to number and whites connected by marriage to the Cherokee were listed.

  13. Hampton, David Keith. Cherokee Old Settlers: The 1896 Old Settler Payroll and The 1851 Old Settler Payroll. Broken Arrow, OK: The author, 1993.

    E99.C5 H35 1993
    List of Cherokee who moved west in 1794 and those who joined them later in 1811-12. These western Cherokee received title to their land by treaty in 1817. By treaty in 1846 the U.S. Government agreed to pay the early Cherokee for giving up their title to lands in the eastern states.

  14. Jordan, Jerry Wright. Cherokee By Blood: Records of Eastern Cherokee Ancestry in the U.S. Court of Claims, 1906-1910. v.1-9. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, 1987-.

    E99.C57 J67
    This is a surname listing of persons who made applications to the U.S. Court of Claims, 1906-1910. There are now 9 volumes in the series. These books were compiled from the "Report of Guion Miller, Special Commissioner to the U.S. Court of Claims, 1906-1910." Southern History has the 12 rolls of microfilm as well.

  15. Siler, David W. The Eastern Cherokees: A Census of the Cherokee Nation in North Carolina, Tennessee, Alabama and Georgia in 1851. Cottonport, LA: Polyanthos, 1972.

    E99.C5 S49
    A census of the Cherokee in 1851 living east of the Mississippi River, those who resisted removal to Indian Territory.

  16. Starr, Emmet. History of the Cherokee Indians and Their Legends and Folk Lore. Oklahoma City, OK: The Warden Company, 1921; reprint, Millwood, NY: Kraus Reprint Company, 1977.

    E99.C5 S8
    This history contains names of Cherokee families and their genealogies.

  17. Tyner, James W. Those Who Cried: The 16,000: a Record of the Individual Cherokees Listed in the United States Official Census of the Cherokee Nation Conducted in 1835. [s.l.]: Chi-ga-u Inc., 1974.

    E99.C5 T98
    A census taken by the U.S. Government of the Cherokee in Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee and North Carolina. The records primarily record only the family name, number in the family, and generalized information as to where they lived, their occupation and occasionally mentions holdings.

  18. U. S. Bureau of Indian Affairs. Census Roll, 1835, of the Cherokee Indians East of the Mississippi River and Index to the Roll. 1 reel. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1960.

    E99.C5 C46 1960 microfilm
    The census rolls for the Eastern Cherokee have been maintained with the removal records. The Henderson Roll, 1835, is the roll customarily made prior to removal. It lists the heads of families and gives information about each family and its property.

  19. Records of the Cherokee Indian Agency in Tennessee, 1801-1835. 14 reels. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1963.

    E99.C5 U29 1963 microfilm
    These reels include the records of the Cherokee agent, a financial and procurement agent for the War Department. There is no index for names. Reel 14 contains a list of tenants under Doublehead, entry #2231. Another list appears as Intruders "Intruders on Shoal Creek," entry #2311.

  20. Records Relating to Enrollment of Eastern Cherokee by Guion Miller, 1908-1910. 12 reels. Washington, DC: Nation?l Archives and Records Service, 1967.

    E99.C5 R35 1967 microfilm
    These records include Millers report and his supplemental report of the Eastern Cherokee. Miller used earlier census lists and rolls made of the Cherokee between 1835 and 1884. Copies of the Chapman, Drennen, and Old Settler rolls of 1851 and the Hester roll of 1884, with indexes, is reproduced as the final roll of this publication.

  21. U. S. Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes. Final Rolls of Citizens and Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes in Indian Territory. Cherokee. 1 reel. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1961.

    E78.I5 F56 1961a microfilm
    Both approved and disapproved names are included on this roll. The roll gives the name, age, gender, degree of Indian blood, and roll and census card number of each person. The series is arranged by tribe and then divided into rolls for citizens by blood, citizens by marriage, and freedmen. The names on the roll are arranged numerically by roll number.

Back to Top

Native Americans --- Chickasaw
  1. Armstrong, K.M. and Bob Curry. Chickasaw Rolls: Annuity Rolls of 1857-1860 and the "1855" Chickasaw District Roll of 1856. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, Inc., 1995.

    E99.C55 A7 1995
    This book contains the transcribed Annuity Payment Rolls for the Chickasaw Indian Nation. The 1855 roll actually refers to payments made in November and December of 1856. These rolls are the closest records to a census that exists. Indexed.

  2. Crumpton, Barbara. 1878 Chickasaw Annuity Roll. Duncan, OK: Creative Copies, 1987.

    E99.C55 C78 1987
    Annuity rolls were compiled for the purpose of listing those persons of Indian blood who were entitled to payments of sums from the Federal government and may therefore be used as an Indian census.

  3. Gibson, Arrell M. The Chickasaws. Norman, OK: University of Oklahoma Press, 1971.

    E99.C55 G5
    The first book length history of the Chickasaw. Gibsons work is a definitive history covering the Chickasaws first contact with Europeans to their removal. Has a good bibliography and index.

  4. Malone, James H. The Chickasaw Nation; A Short Sketch of a Noble People. Louisville, KY: J.P. Morton & Company, Inc., 1922.

    E99.C55 M252
    Malone wrote a good cultural history of the Chickasaw, giving their history from early Colonial times to the twentieth century. Treaties with U.S. are covered and removal. There is an index however, the bibliography is not complete and there are no footnotes.

  5. U. S. Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes. Final Rolls of Citizens and Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes in Indian Territory. Choctaw and Chickasaw. 1 reel. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1961.

    E78.I5 F56 1961a microfilm
    Both approved and disapproved names are included on this roll. The roll gives the name, age, gender, degree of Indian blood, and roll and census card number of each person. The series is arranged by tribe and then divided into rolls for citizens by blood, citizens by marriage, and freedmen. The names on the roll are arranged numerically by roll number.

Back to Top

Native Americans -- Choctaw
  1. Bowen, Jeff. Choctaw of Mississippi Indian Census, 1929-1932, with Birth and Death Records, 1924-1932. Signal Mountain, TN: Mountain Press, 1997.

    E99.C8 B63 1997
    When the Dawes Commission closed the Choctaw tribal roll book in 1907 more than a thousand tribal members remained in the state of Mississippi. These are those people. This transcription of the Choctaw census contains the following information: name of the person, English and Indian name (if given), sex, date of birth, degree of blood, marital status and relation to the head of the household. Allotment and annuity numbers are given for some of the Choctaw.

  2. Mississippi Choctaws Indian Census with Births, Deaths, and Marriages, 1933-1939. Signal Mountain, TN: Mountain Press, 1997.

    E99.C8 B68 1997
    This census index is similar to the census of 1929-1932. The same basic information is provided.

  3. A Complete Roll of all Choctaw Claimants and Their Heirs Existing Under the Treaties Between the United States and the Choctaw Nation.Joe R. Goss, compiler. St. Louis, MO: Robert D. Patterson Stationary Co., 1889; reprint, Conway, AR: Oldbuck Press, 1992.

    E99.C8 C85 1992
    This is an alphabetical listing of all known Choctaw claimants against the United States government. These claims were based on treaties that had been made between the U.S. government and the Choctaw. The introduction written by Joe Goss should be read prior to using the text as Goss provides information about the original documents.

  4. LeMaster, Arlene. Indian Records, Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory Final Rolls, 1902. 4 vols. Poteau, OK: Family Heritage Resources, 1990.

    E99.C8 L47 v.1-4
    This is an index to the "Dawes Commission" final rolls. LeMaster has listed the name of the individual, the roll number for the person, age, gender, blood and census card number. Please read the introduction for useful information. One example: Indians of fifty per cent or more Indian blood could not buy or sell property without the Federal Governments permission so many Indians would downgrade their percentage of Indian blood.

  5. Olsen, Monty. Choctaw Emigration Records, 1831-1856. 2 vols. Calera, OK: Bryan County Heritage Assn., Inc., 1990.

    E99.C8 O57
    A transcription of the microfilmed records. The index lists only the head of the household and people with only one name are not included in the index.

  6. U. S. Bureau of Indian Affairs. Records of the Choctaw Trading House Under the Office of Indian Trade, 1803-1824. 6 reels. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1960.

    E99.C8 U55 1960 microfilm
    These records consist of an Indent Book, 1805-1820 that is on reel 1, and 3 reels of miscellaneous accounts, 1803-1824, and 3 reels of Daybooks, 1808-1819. The Trading House records are full of names of various individuals however there is no comprehensive index to this set of microfilm.

  7. U. S. Commission to the Five Civilized Tribes. Final Rolls of Citizens and Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes in Indian Territory. Choctaw and Chickasaw. 1 reel. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Service, 1961.

    E78.I5 F56 1961a microfilm
    Both approved and disapproved names are included on this roll. The roll gives the name, age, gender, degree of Indian blood, and roll and census card number of each person. The series is arranged by tribe and then divided into rolls for citizens by blood, citizens by marriage, and freedmen. There is no index to this roll. The names on the roll are arranged numerically by roll number.

  8. Wiltshire, Betty. Choctaw and Chickasaw Early Census Records. Carrollton, MS: Pioneer Publishing Co., 1997.

    E99.C8 W65 1997
    This index was prepared from the 1831 census taken after the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, the 1837 and 1839 censuses. These census records only give the name of the head of the household with the number of males and females divided into age groups.

  9. Register of Choctaw Emigrants to the West, 1831 and 1832. Carrollton, MS: Pioneer Publishing Co., 1993.

    E99.C8 W66 1993
    This is a photocopy from the microfilm of the Choctaw lists. Only the name of the head of the family is given with rest divided in age groups. The registration does not include those Choctaw who stopped at Fort Smith on their way to Oklahoma.

Back to Top

Native Americans -- Creek
  1. Hines, Jacqueline Walker and Richard Paul Hines. Creek by Blood. Vol. 1. Mobile, AL: South Eastern Native American Exchange, 1999.

    E99.C9 H54
    The records in this book are a part of Records of the Office of Indian Affairs, Record Group 75. Hines has transcribed names from roll 77 of the Dawes Commission enrollment cards that were produced between the years 1898-1914. Enrollment cards 1-662 are in this book. Names of individuals with age, gender, blood, town of enrollment, the names parents are given.

  2. Hines, Jacqueline. 1832 Census of the Creek Nation East. Mobile, AL: South Eastern Native American Exchange, 1996.

    E99.C9 H56 1996
    This transcription of the 1832 census uses dashes instead of commas when writing the names of the individuals. Hines also included maps at the end of the census to help researchers locate the land of their ancestors.

  3. Snider, Billie Ford. Full Name Indexes: Creek Indians East of the Mississippi; Register: Friendly Creek Indians of Alabama and Northwest Florida, Ancestors and Descendants. Pensacola, FL: Antique Compiling, 1993.

    E99.C9 S63 1993
    In 1972 the U.S. government made a $4 million award to Creek Indians east of the Mississippi River. The Bureau of Indian prepared two "Descendancy Rolls" Affairs. These Descendancy Roll? are the most recent Federal sources available to establish proof of descent from an Eastern Creek ancestor. Parts 1 and 2 of this book are full name indexes of ancestors and descendants of Creek Indians and Part 3 contains documents and notes from research sources.

Back to Top

Native Americans -- Seminole
  1. Bowen, Jeff. Seminole of Florida, Indian Census 1930-1940 with Birth and Death Records 1930-1938. Signal Mountain, TN: Mountain Press, 1997.

    E99.S28 B636 1997
    Bowen has listed the names in primarily alphabetical order. However, there were Several names associated with family listings that were not listed in alphabetical order and these names can be found in the back of the book in a limited index.

  2. Covington, James W. The Seminoles of Florida. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 1992.

    E99.S28 C73 1992
    A comprehensive account of the history of the Florida Seminoles. Covington covers the history of the Seminole from their migration into Florida in the early eighteenth century up into the mid-twentieth century. Appendix A is a census of the Seminole made in July 1913 by Lucien Spencer.

  3. Hines, Jacqueline and Richard Hines. Seminole Roll, Indians by Blood. Vol. 1. Mobile, AL: South Eastern Native American Exchange, 1996.

    E99.S28 H56
    The enrollment of the Seminole was compiled in 1898 and reference is made to each members enrollment on the Seminole tribal roll of 1897 on which the names of the members of the tribe were classified according to the fourteen bands into which the Seminole tribe is divided. This index lists the name of the person, their Dawes roll number, age, sex, blood, band, names of the individuals parents and the bands of the parents.

  4. Lantz, Raymond C. Seminole Indians of Florida, 1850-1879. 2 vols. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, Inc., 1994-95.

    E99.S28 L37 v. 1-2
    Lantz has printed the Subsistence roll and annuity rolls of the Seminole for the years 1850-1879. The books are organized by tribal band. There is no master index.

Back to Top

Page Last Modified: 1/23/2014 4:23 PM